ZEN+ : Simple, Direct, Effective : ZEN+ Benefits

Sometimes you’ve got to wind it up!

By Marcus Santer

Yesterday whilst walking Louis across the golf course I started thinking about one of my old jobs.

It was working for a chain of cheapo jewellers in Exeter.

I rocked up on weekends and college holidays to help out.

My favourite department to work on was watches.

Most of my time was spent replacing batteries.

The work was horrible because it was busy and people tended to treat you like dirt.

Whenever possible, me and a friend went through a routine when one of us had a particularly nasty or rude customer that wanted a new battery.

Here’s how it worked:

Customer: “I want a new battery for this.” – Shoves watch across counter.

Me: “Certainly sir.” – Takes watch.

Customer: “It worked fine yesterday, so don’t got trying to rip me off saying it needs mending or sending away. Just put a new battery in and make it quick cos I’ve got a lot to do.”

You get the picture.

Being young and idealistic. I’d nod to my friend and if he was free he’d go into the small room where we did watch stuff.

It was on the shop floor close to the customers.

I’d follow my friend and we’d get to work.

There was a hammer in the room and I’d make as much noise with it as I could, whilst my buddy would make his own noise.

Knowing the customer could hear us.

After a while my friend would leave the room frowning and give the worried customer a slight shake of his head.

Meanwhile I’d continue banging the hammer on the counter every now and then whilst putting the new battery in.

And then pop out a few seconds later.

With the now working watch, set to the right time and even with a little polish on to make it shine.

The look on the customers face was always priceless.

Anyway.

One day this really nasty piece of work came into the shop.

He was furious.

He’d bought a new watch from the shop and it had stopped working the day after.

And as far as he was concerned it was clearly all my fault.

I ran through the standard questions trying to establish what the possible problem may be.

He was sarcastic, mean and rude.

Sarcastic, mean and rude people used to push all my buttons.

As soon as he slammed the watch down on the counter I took one look at the face – he’d been too busy waving it around in front of me until then – and I saw straight away what the problem was.

I nodded to my mate and went into the small room.

He came in a few seconds later and I showed him the problem. He couldn’t stop laughing and he said: “I’ve got to show Paul this.”

And he went and got Paul.

Paul laughed his socks off and went and got Richard.

Richard did the same.

I almost felt sorry for the owner of the watch.

From his side of the counter, all he could see were people going into the small room and coming out laughing. The event kinda took on a life of its own and after most of the staff had enjoyed a good hearty laugh I finally left the room.

I placed the now working watch, set to the right time and with a shiny polish gently on the counter.

Looked the customer straight in the face and said:

“Sir, this is a mechanical watch which means to make it work you have to wind it up every day. It’s fine there’s nothing wrong with it.”

Everyone was watching him.

Trying not to laugh.

He just took the watch and left.

And the point of the story?

I’m not sure, I just wanted to share it with you.

Though it does demonstrate how if you give something what it needs it will work, and if you don’t it won’t.

Bit like your body really.

To find out how to make your body tick like clockwork…

Go here.

Bye for now

Marcus

P.S. I’ve had a lot of jobs.

Hated most of them.

But there’s one thing I’ve noticed.

There seems to be a direct correlation between how crap a job is and how well the staff get on with each other.

I’ve had okay jobs and staff camaraderie was okay.

I’ve had good jobs and the staff were divided into separate cliques that rarely mixed and there was much back stabbing.

And I’ve had horrible jobs where the staff all pulled together and watched out for each other.

Whatever.

Everyone get’s treated like royalty here.